Laurence Nicola

Laurence Nicola

“Installation, video, photography, drawing… my areas of work are various and have things in common. These fields intermingle and mutually enrich.Videos appear from my installations and objects are created by my videos. The art of drawing influences my photography.
In my drawings, paper shaped and stretched by water becomes skin. This notion of skin, of membrane is also present on the set of collage « Composition # ». I paint, I tear, I hollow out and re-create from pieces. I’m always looking to relate and share with what inspires me. My work is beyond me : otherness. This other part is often linked to the fragility of being. Fragility of the body, of the materials I choose to work with and give form.

My approach develops scenes where the body is always present, always under pressure. I confront the body with objects, materials and other bodies. These combinations cause unseemly situations and actions. I want to release emotions and latent feelings. I evoke desires, frustations and the unspoken. My work gradually leads to a worrying, absurd world. Anguish can become disturbing. The sensuality of the pictures puts the onlooker’s preception in a delicate balance, one that can shift from attraction to repulsion in a flash.

I worked with objects kept in storage, collected. I often take things which are usually thrown away. As a result, I bring them back to life again, so as to create another story. I choose to work with a limited number, this helps me to stay focused on the basic design. Changing a daily act into something with poetical meaning is essential to my videos. That’s why the notion of choregraphy is important to me. This sense of division is present in my shots and videos. The way I centre my photos uses the revealing power of allusion ; even if the body isn’t always shown we can feel its presence. I give greater important to the close-up and associate this with frontality and steady images of the sequence-shot. My aim is for the onlooker to feel the pictures even before he understands them, just as in a dream. Sounds and silences contribute to this feeling of immersion.”